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gamification

Are surveys just really bad games?

Games and research have a lot in common - because at their heart they are about problem solving. The main difference is surveys make no attempt at trying to engage the respondent and typically result in a boring experience for the respondent - which is why a 'good' survey is typically a short one. Perhaps instead of asking if gamifying surveys will deter a certain audience, we should actually be asking do non-gamified ...more »

Submitted by (@peterharrison)

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9 votes
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gamification

Economics of gamification in a "better, quicker, cheaper" world

Let's take resistance to change, norms, etc, aside for a moment and focus on the pure economics of gamification. As research vendors, we're asked to produce better, quicker, cheaper research. Programming a survey can be done in minutes/hours at a low cost. Producing a good game can cost millions and take years in the making (which sometimes ends up with massive commercial failures...). What kind of costs are we talking ...more »

Submitted by (@olivierdegaudemar)

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5 votes
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gamification

Good qual already got game!

The term "gamification" seems to appear most often in the context of boring survey experiences. Quant providers seeking to liberate themselves and their participants from this drudgery might benefit from partnering with good qualitative research designers. We've had to make our research engaging, intriguing, challenging, and rewarding (in more ways than money) for a long time -- for participants as well as clients ...more »

Submitted by

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5 votes
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gamification

Is gamification really a codification of engagement?

Is the study of gamification and it's application really a study in human engagement? Whether looking at Bartle's player types, Wu's player behavoiurs or other groupings and studies of how to get people to play, it seems that this is all a study of engagement. Almost a codificaiton of the very principles of what drives the consumer market. If so this should become a pillar of market research or at the very least "player ...more »

Submitted by (@caurijaye)

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5 votes
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gamification

How do we avoid the 'edutainment' trap?

I'd ask you to watch Gabe Zichermann's Google Tech Talk - from 8:00 min to 8:40 - to understand my question: When Gabe says "parents and teachers got involved" - I can't help but hearing "researchers got involved". In other words, my question is: How do we avoid the edutainment trap? Applying game mechanics is one thing - applying them in a way that actually works however, ...more »

Submitted by (@dankvistbo)

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4 votes
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